EnAppSys has published its Q2 2015 review of Great Britain’s energy generation performance across all fuel and renewable types, and it highlighted some important trends with the significant rise in the proportion of GB’s energy generated solar PV, and the issues with the decline in generation from coal-fired power stations.

Figures included in the second quarter GB Electricity Market Summary showed that solar PV recorded a 153% increase in electricity generation compared to the same period in 2014.

Although at 1.37 GW solar PV represented only around 4% of Britain’s 33GW total electricity generation during the April-June period, it was noticeable that this was the first quarter in which solar has made a significant contribution to national output.

Paul Verrill, Director of EnAppSys, said: “Renewables are playing an increasingly important role in meeting the Britain’s energy needs and as the contribution increases, it must be assumed that its impact on pricing and supply issues will continue to grow.

“The recent instances of negative prices have shown that the system can be slow to react to demand and the wider mix of generation sources is something that traditional power generators and the National Grid will have to react better to.

“For example, we have recently seen the surprising instance of six different CCGT plants and six coal stations remaining online overnight despite lower prices. It is unlikely that the overnight price loss from oversupply will be compensated by increased daytime demand, which suggests some price insensitivity in the market and the likelihood of further negative power prices in the near future.

“If the capacity and output of solar PV and other renewables continues to grow, conventional power generators such as CCGT and coal will have to be more flexible to avoid oversupplying the network and paying the penalty of negative power prices.”

Issue 124 September 2015